Lumber Jill Competes in Lumberjack World Championships

Lumber Jill is a professional firewood delivery service. She provides the highest quality kiln-dried firewood in western North Carolina with a BS and AAS in Natural Resources Management. She’s also Peggy The Magnificient, Master of Yard Protection and BS Detection.

Rob King’s father was a lumberjill

The daughter of an arborist and a lumberjack, Rob King, has become a lumberjill herself. At age 26, she is now competing in competitions and holds multiple world records. King also competes on a team and in individual events. She has traveled to France, Germany, Australia, and New Zealand.

The family has 33 wooded acres and hundreds of cords of firewood. Rob’s father, an experienced lumberjack, once reached a massive oak trunk scarred by deep wedges. Though he later dropped out of the sport, his daughter did. She became a weightlifter and credited her life in rural Delaware County with her strength and focus.

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In the 1940s, a shortage of forestry workers created an opportunity for female loggers. Women were recruited to perform tasks formerly performed by men, but it was hard work and dangerous. She compiled her experiences in a diary in 1953, which is now in the Modern Archives.

Martha King’s father is an arborist.

It’s not every day that a woman can compete in a lumberjack competition, but 26-year-old Martha King can. Her father is an arborist, and she’s a skilled lumberjack. King has eight Tuatahi Racing Axes, two $1,800 crosscut saws, and specialized safety gear.

King grew up around trees. She discovered the sport while attending Penn State, where she studied animal sciences. She competed in various lumberjack championships, finishing third in the national championship in June. Her father, an arborist, has always been an avid lumberjack, but King has made the sport her own.

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King’s father was active in the Civil Rights Movement and encouraged his son to get involved. He was known as ‘Johnny Appleseed’ and had extensive knowledge of tree growth. The young King often recalled his father sending him to work in the fields to understand the people of his forefathers better.

King’s father competed in the underhand chop.

King’s father is a lumberjack. He owns 33 acres of wood and chops hundreds of cords of firewood. He once reached the fallen oak trunk and sliced it with deep wedges. Today, King competes in the underhand chop, using an ax and crosscut saw. She also uses special safety gear and takes her wood-chopping equipment seriously.

King’s father’s passion for logging

Martha King’s father is a lumberjack, and his love of firewood led him to take up the sport. He owns 33 wooded acres in rural Delaware County and has accumulated hundreds of cords of firewood. Rob King has also made the sport competitive, competing against other loggers while wearing an aluminum shield over his feet and legs. His daughter Kathryn has followed in his footsteps and is now a champion weightlifter.

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King’s mother is a lumberjill

Martha King, a 28-year-old lumberjill from Delaware County, PA, has packed an incredible amount of experience into her short life. Her father and mother are tree service business owners in Chadds Ford, PA. She competes in lumberjack championships all over the world. King won the 2015 Lumberjack World Championship in Paris and recently competed in Hayward, Wisconsin’s fifth Lumberjack World Championship.

While the women’s field has been developing slower, the number of female lumberjills has increased significantly. There are now many forestry programs offered in schools across the country, and more women compete in lumberjack competitions than ever before. The match featured some of the best lumberjills in the country.

During World War II, women were recruited to work in the forestry industry. The Women’s Land Army recruited teenage girls as domestic servants and shop workers. The lumberjills were out of the control of their parents. In this way, they helped the war effort by cutting down trees in the forests.

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